Tuesday, November 10, 2015

2015 Lumen Flashlight Use Heat From Your Finger To Power Its LED Bulb


It’s not the most powerful torch light in the world, but it just might be the most convenient. Called Lumen, the tiny flashlight’s LED bulb is designed to power using your body heat. Simply put a finger on the designated area on top and the device can draw enough heat to keep itself powered to light your way in the dark.  
That’s right, it’s a torch light that shoots out a beam with no batteries, no solar panels, and no hand-cranking. As long as you keep a finger on top of the case (and you aren’t wearing gloves), it should switch on and stay lit, giving you a convenient, portable light that can never run out of power.The Lumen is a tiny flashlight that measures 1.6 x 3.2 x 0.4 inches and weighs a super light 1.5 oz, with a hole in one corner for conveniently adding onto your key fob. It houses an equally small CREE LED that can deliver a brightness on par with the flash you see used in smartphones. Yes, that isn’t much, but if you’ve ever used your phone as an instant flashlight in a jiffy, then you also know how useful it can still be, despite the underpowered LED. A ceramic bar that functions as a thermoelectric generator is situated on top of the case, producing enough power to turn on the LED at a 3,000 mCd of light output.Think the flashlight is too small to find in the dark? It just might be, which is why it comes with an option to be outfitted with a tritium vial inside, which should give it instant visibility in the dark for up to 10 years, ensuring you can easily find it, whether on a messy desk or a crowded pouch.

Wednesday, September 30, 2015

2015 FLYBi

FLYBi, a quadcopter designed to put you in the "cockpit," sort of. It aims to fulfill the promise of earlier concepts like Oculus FPV that merge virtual reality tech with drones to provide a first-person view of the flight.
FLYBi's connected goggles receive live-streamed video from the drone's on-board 1080p 12MP camera and displays it on a pair of HD LCD displays before your eyes. The headset is also equipped with a sensor that tracks your head movements so you can control the drone's camera simply by turning your head in a direction – look to the left and the drone's camera pans that direction, providing a virtual flying experience. The HD camera has Wi-Fi and on-board storage as well. It's located within a transparent protective dome, which makes us wonder if glare or reflections might be a problem at certain angles. There's also a front-facing camera on the goggles themselves, so that you can switch over to see what's actually right in front of you on the ground without taking off the headset. The drone itself is a quadcopter that's roughly the size of a MacBook, area-wise, and boasts an obstacle avoidance system, communication range of 2,000 meters (1.2 miles) and 25-28 minutes of flight time per battery charge.At just over two pounds (1 kg), it's also in a class of other drones that tout themselves as lightweight like the Atlas Erida. While the goggles would seem to make FLYBi a top candidate for drone racing, it will need to drastically improve on its top speed of 50 km/h (31 mph).

Monday, September 28, 2015

2015 Maxaero X-Star

  The X-Star from MaxAero is another entry in the suddenly competitive personal drone field, featuring a 3-axis-stabilized gimbal, a convenient slot-loading battery and a manufacturer-reported 25-minute flight time. The smartphone app allows the user to set up to twenty waypoints in a preprogrammed flight plan as well as enables FPV.

Friday, September 25, 2015

Possible 2019 Apple Car ?

After dominating sales of smartphones, tablets, and other electronics, Apple is reportedly secretly designing its first car, code-named Titan. Here are some features of Apple’s rumored car. The Windshield features four times as many pixels as reality. The Driver is prompted to sign into iCloud before each gear shift. Compatible with most major roads. Recommends new driving speeds based on user’s past favoritesSleek, unobtrusive airbags. The Windshield cracks easily, though car typically still works fine. The afterward Sticker price of $85,000 drops to $199 with two-year Verizon contract. The Wheels will turn into rainbow pinwheels whenever car stalls. Lightweight but powerful enough to careen across six lanes of traffic and through guardrails of overpass also Comes with couple of cool Apple stickers.

Thursday, September 24, 2015

2015 Ring Clock

Want a watch but don’t want to use up the wrist space? Here’s a way to get the time presented to you in circular format on a ring. The time only gets displayed when you rotate the ring, so it doesn’t stay on the whole time. When it is activated you simply look down and see the time just like with a watch.

2015 Google Glass

Google Glass represents a new way to see the world, by putting the convenience of Google right in your field of vision. It gives you the answers you need right when and where you need them, allows you to take pictures and video of what you’re seeing, from your point of view, and lets you hang out with people in your circles all hands free.

2015 Brunton Hydrogen Reactor

You won’t need a power outlet to charge up this unit, as it serves as its own hydrogen reactor, using hydrogen fuel cells. This can allow you to keep things charged for several days, making it great for emergency kits, camping trips, and survival situations.

2015 August Smart Lock

This August smart lock is the lock of the future, available today. It lets you lock and unlock your door using your smartphone, no keys needed. It can also be set to automatically lock if the door has been shut but not locked. You can let the people you want in, just by using your phone.

2015 XYZ 3D Food Printer

dsc0071.jpgThe XYZ printing 3D Food Printer turns ingredients into uncooked food, perfect for pastry decorating. Just like a 3D printer, the Food Printer can create various 3D edible items. The machine has an onscreen touch display that lets users select a preset design for the shape of the food. Users can also import designs from the Web or use a USB drive to upload their own designs.

2015 Parrot Pot

The Parrot Pot is linked to mobile devices and will automatically water users' plants from a reservoir of water inside the pot. The pot monitors soil moisture level, soil fertility, temperature and brightness and remaining water level. The app then shares this information and alerts the user if more water or fertilizer is needed.

2015 Axxess CE Air2

The Axxess CE Air2 avoids the waste of amplication energy by pushing sound waves off of a desk or table by levitating in the air. The speaker is controlled via Bluetooth, allowing users to control the volume from 33 feet away.

2015 Rollkers Electric shoes

This transportation device made by Rollkers attaches to the bottom of your shoes and increases your average walking speed by seven more miles an hour. The bad news is this device is not for sale yet it`s still in its first prototype phase.

2015 Invoxia Triby

The new Invoxia Triby is a smart fridge magnet that can make phone calls, receive digital messages and play music through FM radio stations or internet radio.

2015 Parrot RNB

This Parrot RNB 6 in-vehicle infotainment system offers media playback, navigation, telephony, a dash cam, air control, parking assistance and onboard diagnostics all built into one simple system. It supports Apple CarPlay and Android Auto.

2015 BeeWi

In addition to being able to turn the lights on and off, the cool new color and intensity of the BeeWi wirelessly controlled home smart lights. Is that they also can be controlled all by a smart phone.

2015 Zepp sensor

This new 2015 Zepp sensor attached to the end of a golf club, tennis racket or baseball bat finds motion patterns and then uses 3D and video
analysis software features to allow users to view and improve their swing.

Saturday, August 15, 2015

2015 Ultrahaptics



Sometimes an up-and-coming technology can feel a little bit like magic; that's the case with Ultrahaptics, which lets you "feel" objects and sensations several inches above your keyboard, and then manipulate them. Using ultrasound, the tech gives the illusion that you are actually feeling bubbles touch your palm, or lets you move around a simple game object on the screen. 
The fascinating thing about the technology is that it doesn't involve any extra gear on the part of the user: no gloves, no rings -- all the tech is in the hardware and the accompany software. 
Still in development, Ultrahaptics will be an interesting tech to watch -- like many developmental technologies, it has great potential, but whether we will actually see it in future systems is still to be determined.